In Being Social Depression Mental Health Physical Health

How Being Social Helps Your Mental Health


Mental Health
Collaborative Content

What’s the right thing to do if you’re feeling blue? Could you be mentally healthier if you kick up your heels at a social event? Maybe so. 
Of course, you can deal with depression and other mental health problems by changing your habits, taking better care of your body, or maybe even seeing a doctor or counselor. Another thing you might have overlooked is the need to connect with others in social settings.
It Improves Your Physical Health
The more positive social connections you have, the better your physical health might be. Fortunately, having strong social ties can help with physical problems like:
  • High blood pressure
  • Cancer
  • Wound healing
  • Heart disease
  • Chronic conditions
  • Mobility problems

All this is also good news for your mental health. Medical conditions that cause pain or fear can influence your mental health in a very bad way. Social relationships improve your physical health, and that translates into less depression, anxiety, and irritability.
It Motivates You
  • Socializing can motivate you in many ways. Most importantly, it gives our life purpose and meaning. Here are a few examples of how relationships can encourage you to do the things that improve your quality of life:
  • You strive to be mentally healthy so you can be there for your loved ones when they need you.
  • You hope the people you interact with will respect you, so you adopt better habits.
  • You don’t want to be a downer, so you work harder to keep your mood up.
  • You don’t want to let your friends down, so you go out and do activities with them that are both mentally and physically good for you.
  • You enjoy the companionship of others, so you control unhealthy urges that would otherwise put you at physical or mental risk.
  • You spend time with others who encourage you to take better care of yourself and pursue what makes you happy.

It Fends Off Depression or Helps Your Recover
People who are socially well-connected tend to get depressed less often. When they do get depressed, they recover more quickly and have a much lower risk of relapse. Quality is more important than quantity of relationships here. Several studies have shown that people who have high-quality social relationships are much more likely to avoid depression or get over it quicker. 
It Reduces Anxiety
In some ways, spending time with others can increase anxiety, at least momentarily. Yet overall, social relationships can help you feel calmer and more relaxed. If you go to a social event and feel accepted and acknowledged, you’re going to feel safer in the world. You know you have people to help you when needed, so you have less to worry about, too. You’ll also get your mind off your problems and worries. Once again, the quality of the relationships is paramount.
If you want to improve your mental health, then, don’t forget to get out and spend time with friends or family members. Do recreational activities with them. Join them in a hobby. Have a meal with them or go to a party with them. Or, just have a quiet evening chat together. The more you interact with the people you care about, the deeper and stronger those ties will become. You’ll be happier and more mentally healthy.


 Marie Miguel Biography

Marie Miguel has been a writing and research expert for nearly a decade, covering a variety of health- related topics. Currently, she is contributing to the expansion and growth of a free online mental health resource with BetterHelp.com. With an interest and dedication to addressing stigmas associated with mental health, she continues to specifically target subjects related to anxiety and depression.






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